What does the term "Comparison operator" mean?

A type of operator which compares two input values, called operands.

Expressions using this type of operator always return one of two values: true or false.

For example, if you were to ask if the number 2, the same as the number 3, 2 = 3? This would return false.

If instead you were to ask if the number 2 is less than the number 3 2 < 3, this would return true.

In these cases: 2 and 3 are the operands, and = and < are the operators.

Although they vary in how they are written between languages, the comparison operators are roughly as follows:

OperatorExampleDescription
==1 == 2 returns falseare these values equal to one another
===2 === ‘2’ returns falseare these values equal to one another and do they have the same type
!=1 != 2 returns trueare these values not equal to one another
!==1 !== ‘1’ returns trueare these values not equal to one another and do they have a different type
>1 > 2 returns falseis the left value greater than the right value
<1 < 2 returns trueis the left value less than the right value
>=3 >= 2 returns trueis the left value greater than or equal to the right value
<=1 <= 2 returns trueis the left value less than or equal to the right value

In some languages there is another comparison operator known as a ternary operator which requires 2 operands and 2 statements. For example 1 > 2 ? "1 is more than 2" : "1 is less than or equal to 2". This will return ‘1 is less than or equal to 2’ but it will not evaluate the statement (1 > 2) itself.

Leave a Reply

Thank you for choosing to leave a comment. Comments may be moderated.