What does the term mean?

A command for the computer to do something. A statement is like a sentence.

This command does not produce a value like an expression does.

Area = PI * radius * radius; would be a statement as opposed to an expression as it does not do anything until you use the variable Area in something.

Other examples are when you define a function – it will not return a value until you call it, but its purpose is to do something.

What does the term mean?

A type of operator which allows you to perform join different strings together.

Although they vary in how they are written between languages, the string operators are roughly as follows:

OperatorExampleDescription
.“my name is…” . “Joe…”  returns “my name is…Joe…”Concatenates or joins two strings together
.=“my name is…” += “Joe…”  returns “Joe…my name is…”Appends the text on the right to the text on the left

What does the term mean?

Operators that affect three variables.

There’s only one of these in C# and it’s also called a conditional operator.

You have a statement and provide a value for if that statement is true, and one for if it is false.

So, “x=3” is the statement, “X is 3” can be the value for true, and “X is not 3” can be the value for false.

What does the term mean?

The process of correcting any data that is in an incorrect unit when compared to the rest of your data.

When aggregating data, some records may have different units of measurement even though they represent the same thing.

For example, temperature measured in both Celsius and Fahrenheit.

What does the term mean?

A program that tells the computer what to do in its own language.

Some programming languages, such as C#, do not do this. C# specifically uses .NET CLR to translate your instructions into the computer’s language. Such programs are called Intermediate Languages (IL).

What does the term mean?

A type of operator which tells you how a particular piece of code or variable is stored in your program.

Type operators are not available in all programming languages.

Although they vary in how they are written between languages, the type operators are roughly as follows:

OperatorExampleDescription
typeoftypeof “John” returns “string”
typeof 3.14 returns “number”
Tells you what data type your variable is using.

It returns this information in the form of a operand with a data type of string.

This can be useful for telling you if you have stored a number in a variable in a way that you can perform maths upon it (an integer) or not (a string).

Sometimes the result is not useful for providing specifics e.g. in Javascript you can use a type operator on a date or array, but these would return object.

instanceofinstanceof jack-russel-terrier returns true (of the class dog)Tells you if your object is an instance of something and returns true if it is, and false if it is not.